Live, Love, Create!

Ep 5 What Is A Book Coach & Do I Need One?

July 29, 2021 Stephanie Bourbon Episode 5
Live, Love, Create!
Ep 5 What Is A Book Coach & Do I Need One?
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Live, Love, Create!
Ep 5 What Is A Book Coach & Do I Need One?
Jul 29, 2021 Episode 5
Stephanie Bourbon

What is a book coach and do I need one?

You may not.

A book coach is someone who helps you with your book or story (for film & TV writers). They can help you with the big story picture or with line editing. There are different types.
 

1. Developmental or story coaches

or

2.  Line editors

Basically, you can find someone to work on the big picture stuff or you can find someone who just goes over your book line by line.

They are different.

I recommend line editors for self-published authors.

What is a discovery call?


This is how I decide if you need a book coach and if we are a great match.  This is something that happens at the beginning of coaching with someone. Be wary of anyone who says to send them a pile of money without a call.

The cost

It's expensive. It takes time to do this job and if the cost is super low it's impossible to do a good job. We want you to succeed so we want to spend time with you. You are paying for our time and devotion to you and your work.

You may not need a book coach-yet.
Only you know if you are ready.

How to find a book coach?

Google
Social media
Referrals
Professional organizations
Conferences
YouTube

Women's Fiction Writers Association
Romance Writers of America
Sisters in Crime
The Society of Children's Book Writers & Illustrators
Mystery Writers of America
Science Fiction Writers of America

 
Join groups on FB and get referrals
WFWA
Female Writers' Society   
LA TV writing group
Kidlit 411
Fiction Writers
10 Minutes With An Expert
RWA
Contemporary Romance Writers 

Books I love for writers 
Story Genius - Lisa Cron
Wired For Story - Lisa Cron
Save The Cat  - Blake Snyder
Anatomy of A Story - John Truby
Story - Robert McKee
Hidden Tools of Comedy - Steve Kaplan
The Comedy Hero's Journey - Steve Kaplan
Writing From The Middle-James Scott Bell
The Plot Whisperer - Martha Alderson
Blueprint For A Book - Jennie Nash

My website for coaching
My author site
Find out more about me & offers

Follow me on social media
Instagram
Twitter
TikTok
Facebook
Join my Facebook Group for female writers


My blog for writers
Get on my VIP list
 

Music from Uppbeat (free for Creators!):
https://uppbeat.io/t/hartzmann/clear-sky
License code: D2L28UQBZWZ6Z0TC

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/LiveLoveCreate)

Show Notes Transcript

What is a book coach and do I need one?

You may not.

A book coach is someone who helps you with your book or story (for film & TV writers). They can help you with the big story picture or with line editing. There are different types.
 

1. Developmental or story coaches

or

2.  Line editors

Basically, you can find someone to work on the big picture stuff or you can find someone who just goes over your book line by line.

They are different.

I recommend line editors for self-published authors.

What is a discovery call?


This is how I decide if you need a book coach and if we are a great match.  This is something that happens at the beginning of coaching with someone. Be wary of anyone who says to send them a pile of money without a call.

The cost

It's expensive. It takes time to do this job and if the cost is super low it's impossible to do a good job. We want you to succeed so we want to spend time with you. You are paying for our time and devotion to you and your work.

You may not need a book coach-yet.
Only you know if you are ready.

How to find a book coach?

Google
Social media
Referrals
Professional organizations
Conferences
YouTube

Women's Fiction Writers Association
Romance Writers of America
Sisters in Crime
The Society of Children's Book Writers & Illustrators
Mystery Writers of America
Science Fiction Writers of America

 
Join groups on FB and get referrals
WFWA
Female Writers' Society   
LA TV writing group
Kidlit 411
Fiction Writers
10 Minutes With An Expert
RWA
Contemporary Romance Writers 

Books I love for writers 
Story Genius - Lisa Cron
Wired For Story - Lisa Cron
Save The Cat  - Blake Snyder
Anatomy of A Story - John Truby
Story - Robert McKee
Hidden Tools of Comedy - Steve Kaplan
The Comedy Hero's Journey - Steve Kaplan
Writing From The Middle-James Scott Bell
The Plot Whisperer - Martha Alderson
Blueprint For A Book - Jennie Nash

My website for coaching
My author site
Find out more about me & offers

Follow me on social media
Instagram
Twitter
TikTok
Facebook
Join my Facebook Group for female writers


My blog for writers
Get on my VIP list
 

Music from Uppbeat (free for Creators!):
https://uppbeat.io/t/hartzmann/clear-sky
License code: D2L28UQBZWZ6Z0TC

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/LiveLoveCreate)

Hi, this is Stephanie and this week I am going to talk to you about how to find and hire a book coach. What a book coaches and if you even need one. I'm Stephanie Bourbon. And this is the live love create podcast for female writers with a focus on fiction, screenwriting and television writing come back every week for new episodes.


Hey, so today I was in a Facebook group, and somebody was asking about hiring a book coach, and I was giving advice, and many people were giving advice, and there was so much great advice. But there was also some that I was like, I don't know if that's 100% correct. In my experience, now, everybody has different experiences. So I thought that instead of the podcast I have planned, I would go over what a book coach does the different types of book coaches, and if you even need one, because some people simply are not ready for book coaching. So let's get started on basically, what a book coach is, who they are and what they do. So basically, a book coach can help you in many different ways with your novel or your memoir, or your nonfiction, or whatever it is that you're writing. I work with fiction, authors, screenwriters, and television writers. I started my business in 2008. And I started calling it I think back then it was script concierge, and then it evolved the story concierge. And now it's just under my umbrella of Giuliani being creative consulting. But the reason that I started it is because back in 2008, I had taken years and years of screenwriting and television writing courses, and I would be chatting with friends, like on social media that would talk about how they wasted all this money because they really want to write comedy. And they took a screenwriting or television writing class from somebody who teaches how to write crime, because there's, they are actually different genres. And while storytelling principles are the same, things like television writing, especially television writing, have very specific things. And it's the same thing with books, you're going to be coached a bit different from somebody who's teaching you how to write picture books, than somebody who's teaching you how to write a romance, or romantic comedy, etc, etc, crime, mystery, whatever. So I started doing it to help basically guide people in the right direction based on all the classes I had taken. And I would talk to people and they would say, I want to write a 30 minute sitcom for television, and I would, you know, have a consultation with them and say, okay, you need to take these six classes from these six instructors. And I've taken these classes, or I've heard things about these classes. And that's how my business started as a concierge service to help specifically television writers, mostly in Los Angeles back in 2008. And then it evolved into screenwriting, and book coaching, because I have worked as a writer for 30 years, and I've worked in many different areas. I've worked in screenwriting and graphic novels, and I've done work for hire. And I've written picture books. And I've, you know, taken a stab at young adult books, which I spent five years learning and taking courses from, and yes, my young adult books at this present time has not been published. But I spent a lot of time so I basically have a degree in writing young adult books. So I know, a lot of really great instructors that focus on that, and a lot of great schools and what you need to do if you're writing young adult. So that's why when I work one on one with writers, I give them a discovery form, and we discuss what they're working on. And then I can help them move forward. Sometimes I'm not the right coach for them. So that's a little background on how I got started doing it. And I just want to cover First of all, what what coaches like myself do, because there's a lot of different ways that you can work with one. So there are developmental editors or story coaches. That's what I do, which means that I will work with you on the big picture of your story, which in a word means or an award in a sentence, it means that I'm not going through inline editing, I'm not going to tell you to make your sentences more flowery, or to write them in a more literary style or to get to them faster, or to not use the same word so many times, I'm not going to do that because I'm not a line editor. Line editing is a very specific thing that I don't do. I'm not great at it. If I self publish, if I did Self Publish once. And if I do it again, I will always hire a line editor because it helps tremendously. But what I do is the story in big picture, edits and notes. And that means in a nutshell, that when we have our first discovery call, I find out where you are in your story and what you need. There are many writers that are at the beginning stages of their Novel Writing and they actually don't need a story coach. What they need is someone to help them with a roadmap through their story. a blueprint as Jenny Nash from author accelerator calls it a blueprint, a blueprint for your story. By the way, she has a new book called blueprint for your story coming out in, I think September, which I was lucky enough to read. And it's amazing. But I will talk about that another time. 

And hopefully, I will get her on here to interview about that. But she talks about the blueprint for your story. And what this is, is at the beginning, it doesn't have to be before you have your story idea. And it can be once you have your first draft, but it's definitely easier if you do this before your book is written. So there are a lot of coaches like myself, who will work with those beginning stages to help you layout the map for your entire story. Now, I also do what's called whole novel coaching, or screenplay or television script coaching, and that is when the writer is has completely finished their work. And they need someone to go through it and give them develop mental notes. Because the truth is, it's impossible to see your own story when you are the writer, you think that it's clear on the page, but there's absolutely no way to know if it is unless you get feedback from somebody. Now, if you are being traditionally published is that 100% necessary to hire a developmental coach? Absolutely not. If you have an agent, or if you have done a lot of workshops or gone to conferences, and even maybe you've done a whole novel workshop, or you've had beta readers, and your fatigue group in your book is strong enough, and you get an agent, that way you will work with your agent, a lot of agents are what are called editorial agents. And those are the ones that I recommend, especially if you're newer, because they will go through and you will do a revision, at least one revision of your book before it gets sent out to publishing houses. And then at the publishing house level, your editor that you get assigned to is going to go through that again. Oh, these are still big picture story edits, we're talking about character plot dialogue, themes, things like that. These are not line at a chat line editing is always last, it's like when you look at a wedding cake. The line editing is like the flour that is on top of the icing that's on top of the cake. It might even be the little bead that's on top of the flour that's on top of the icing on top of the cake. What I do is the developmental stuff, which is basically like, okay, you're making a chocolate cake. Do you want to make it a spicy chocolate cake? Or do you want to make it a caramel chocolate cake, I'm basically at the beginning with the flour and the eggs and the flavor. But there are so many different levels. So let's talk next about how you find the right book coach or manuscript coach, story coach for you. There are lots and lots and lots of different ways to find book coaches. Many people do it by googling. Now googling is fine. And I spend time every single month changing my SEO on my website and posting stuff. So when people Google Book coach, I will come up. But to be honest, it's a hard way to sell yourself that way. And it's also a hard way to choose because you don't know and some people are amazing at writing sales pages. Now me I suck at writing and sales pages. But some people are really great at it. And so you read it and you're like, Oh my god, I need a coach, I'm gonna pay them and I better send them the money. And sometimes you end up with the wrong coach. So googling is fine. It's not a bad thing to do. But what I want to suggest if you google and find somebody that way, so just really do your research. And let me just add in it does not matter if your coach has been published at all. That is one of those things that I see people say and people have actually said to me, Well, you're not famous. There's a lot of famous writers out there who aren't great book coaches. And there are a lot of amazing story coaches who aren't famous writers, they don't go hand in hand, and it is a misbelief that somebody needs to be famous. Now. I understand that it gives cloud. But it really isn't necessary. I would say the caveat is if you are talking to a book coach who claims that they can get you to the bestseller list,

then yeah, they better be on the bestseller list, or they better have a long list of clients who have hit the bestseller list based on their teachings or have worked with them. I have a friend who is a coach and now she's an agent and she is amazing. And like she has, I want like 65 of her clients got agents and published in a really short amount of time now she's somebody who I absolutely adore. And I recommend her to anybody who's writing for children, which young adult and under. I think she's now agent in middle grade and picture books, but she's amazing for that specific genre. And I have another friend actually she's an acquaintance who I met on Facebook who works in the romance industry and she is a self published author and her books make a ton of money and she is like this amazing guru and marketing. So if you're looking for somebody To teach you how to market then she would be the right person for you. So just don't get focused on how many books has the person published as a way to judge whether they're the right coach for you. And so I've covered googling, and that's fine and not getting stuck on things. But googling is great. Facebook groups for writers are amazing. And there are so many amazing ones out there. There's kidlit. For one, one, there's the women fiction writers one, there's the writing gals, I have one called the female writers society. There, Jane Freeman has a group. There's screenwriting groups, their stage 32 has groups. There's the LA television writer group, there's, I think there's a comedy writing group, Steve Kaplan has a comedy writing group for people who have attended his classes. There are a lot, a lot, a lot, a lot. There's manuscript wish wish list. There's 10 minutes with an expert. There's so many out there on Facebook, if you belong to these writing groups, like I would join some of them. And just ask him there, has anybody use a book coach? Can you recommend them but be specific in your ask what you're looking for what genre you write where you are in your in your career, because it matters. But word of mouth through these groups is a really, really great way to find somebody. Another great way is to simply ask your critique group or your writing friends, have you used a book coach, and you know, what were they like and and find out from them get one on one recommendations as well. Many of these organizations have mentor programs. I'm a mentor right now for the romance Writers of America. I've been a mentor, the spring of 2021. Last year in 2020, I was a mentor for the women's fiction writers Association. And I believe that I'm going to do that again, this fall. And I do that so people get to know me, I've also spoken at a lot of online conferences. And it's another way to get people to know me, I've also spoken in conferences in person, but since 2019, that's kind of not been a thing right now. So when you go to writing conferences, you can meet coaches there, maybe they'll give a 45 minute talk on dialogue or character plotting or whatever. And if you like them, and they say, Hey, I also have coaching services, then you get a sense of who they are that way, that's another great way to find coaches, YouTube is a great way to find writing coaches, you can just go in there, and it's a search engine. So type writing, or fiction, or romance or whatever it is you're working on, and start watching YouTube videos and get to know people. But what I want to help you with next now that you know, ways to find book coaches is how to make a decision on if you need one and what kind you may or may not need. So you can have a book coach at any stage of your writing. This is 100% true, but let me tell you, this book coaches charge a decent amount of money. And the reason that we charge a decent amount of money is it's really, it's a job that takes a lot of time. And if we're broke, and we're charging you like three or $400 to like read your entire novel, think about it, what kind of notes are you going to get, because if I'm charging, let's just use that 400 is a great number to use. Because somebody in one of the groups I was in recently said I wouldn't pay over $400 for someone to give you developmental notes on your book. If I, I would need 10 or more writers every two weeks. So 20 plus people a month to barely make a living. I live in Los Angeles, and that would barely cover rent and bills, right? And that's before taxes, and you get tax pretty high when you're doing something like this. So if I'm doing 20 plus people a month, how am I going to give you the attention that you deserve and need when you hire a private coach, it's absolutely 100% impossible, there's no way to do it. So be aware of somebody whose prices are too low. I know that it's like really tempting to take those lower price coaches, but it's impossible for the coach to give you their 100% undivided attention when they're charging prices that are that low, because they're going to have to keep a day job, or their volume is going to be so high that they're not going to be able to give you this specific attention, which is why a lot of us have higher prices. And the reason is so we can take less people and still give you one on one feedback and attention that you and your work deserve. But I want to also say that you might be at the stage where you're at the beginning. And then like I said earlier, you need somebody just for the blueprint of your book, or the outlining of your book or the roadmap of your book. Now like me, personally, I charge less like half as much for that because it is less work for me than it is going through an entire novel. I mean, an entire novel can be anywhere from like 200 to four to 500 pages. I tend to not do fantasy so most of the books I work on are 300 or under but it's a lot of work to go through the story and understand that and then coach a writer through it. So that's the reason for the high prices. Nobody is, you know, trying to take advantage of writers or anything, it's really because it's a lot of work. And we want you to get the attention that you deserve. So I just want you to do these things. When you find somebody, however you find them before you sign any kind of contract or send any money to anybody here is that list. So you need to get on what I call a discovery call. Some people call it an intake call, or you can email back and forth with somebody on they will ask you questions, you want to make sure that the coach is really going to help you with what you need, whatever it is, and maybe you don't know what you need, which is fine. But then think about it. Why are you hiring a book? COACH? Why are you looking for a book coach, if you're not even sure what you need? I apologize if there was a weird sound there, I needed to get some water. So anyhow, hopefully it didn't break up. And then you're like, What is she talking about? But so if you don't even know what kind of book coach you need, then I'm going to ask you to take a step back, you probably don't need a book coach yet. I would say once you have a first draft done, or second draft done, or when you're at the stage where you are getting multiple rejections, and you can't fix it, you've gotten the full manuscript request, and you don't know why you're getting rejected. And your critique group has read your book hundreds of times, and everybody knows the story, and you've sent to beta readers, and you can't figure it out. That's a great time to hire a developmental coach for your entire novel. Because that is somebody who doesn't know you who can go in and help you understand what is not working. But you might also just need, like I said, the the basic beginnings of book coaching, or maybe you just need help with your pitch or whatever. But when you're find that coach, make sure you interview them as much as they are potentially interviewing you. If you have a book coach or find one online that says send me $3,000, and then send me your manuscript, but there's no intake or discussion with them or anything, I honestly wouldn't do that. Now, I have a lot of friends who are book coaches, and I am a book coach. And there are a lot of times when I will recommend somebody else. I specifically just to give you an example, I coach writers who are writing romantic comedies, contemporary fiction, women's fiction, basically anything that you might see on the Hallmark Channel, or you know, mainstream television, that's not crime, or horror, or fantasy. I don't coach writers who write fantasy, I actually love fantasy, but not as much as I love contemporary. And I have a lot of coaching friends, who I mean, I have a lot of writing friends who have gone to coaches for fancy specific, and then they're going to get more out of it. Because for me that it's just not 100% what I'm strongest at, and I don't love it as much. And if you're reading four or more books a month that you're coaching people that you really want to make sure that you are also enjoying the genre, and you know it inside and out. So that's why I am very specific with who I coach, I also only coach female writers at this time, even though I have helped male writers in the past. And the same thing with television and films, I tend to work with writers who are writing sitcoms, want to write sitcoms, or are writing the more mainstream contemporary stuff. I mean, if you think about like, Grey's Anatomy, or even the fosters shows like that Silicon Valley, things like that are going to be what's up my alley, more than other things. But television writing is a horse of a whole different color than book coaching. So I won't go into that right now. But so make sure that when you talk to your book coach to find let them know what you're writing, say you're writing fantasy, or speculative or magical realism, or science fiction or a thriller, whatever it is, and let them know what you're writing and make sure that they coach people in that and that they're comfortable with that. And they can help you specifically ask them questions about the timeline. If they are charging three, four or five $6,000 for the book coaching, you are well within your rights to ask them about that fee like what do I get for that and if they don't lay it out for you, then I honestly probably would not go with that coach. I always lay out for my writers exactly what they're going to get. I generally coach for full novels for four months, but everybody does things differently. So you really need to make sure that you are interviewing them as much as they are potentially interviewing you and should be it's a partnership that you guys are entering into. And a lot of times becomes a lifelong friendship and or mentor writer situation. I have people I have been coaching for years who continually come back to me to help them with other projects because they know me they know my style and we work really well together it's really important that you work well with coaches now. I want to say that a lot of writing coaches have a no refund policy. And again, it is because this is so much work. I generally have a no refund policy but I, I've been starting to give writers a, they can get a little bit back at the beginning. But if I've spent a month going over your book, and then all of a sudden, you're like, No, I don't like this, give me a refund, that's really not cool. Because it's time that I've spent where I could have been working with somebody else or doing something else to make a living, I mean, it is also a business. So it's fine if they don't have a refund policy. But I know that that's really scary. So just make sure that you ask them about that and get some kind of contract. Now, it doesn't have to be a big legal document with all this stuff. But just get something in writing and saying, like I am paying you $4,000 for four months of coaching, and I am going to get these things or they should send you something that says, For this payment, this is what you're going to get. And you need to also know that they are also a person, and you need to be flexible with them. Like they need to be flexible with you. Like if you have four calls setup, and then one of you has to miss a call. That's okay. It's not an immediate like, Oh my god, I was scammed. But you need to just be in communication with this person. The one great thing another not one great thing. But another great thing about working with a business with a book coach or any kind of manuscript coach is it sort of sets you up for your working relationship with your agent, now you are not going to be emailing your agent, every single note and every single idea you have, but it especially if you're new and you've never had an agent before, then you've never worked with an editor, it's sort of a taste into that world of working with somebody one on one on your novel,
or your screenplay or your television show or whatever. I want to get into really quickly about line editing, that is something different usually that is done at the very end. If it was me and I was planning on publishing, traditionally, I would not personally spend the money on a line editor because you are going to get that through your publishing house, I would do everything that I could in my power to make sure that the grammar and everything is okay. And then I'm not repeating words, but your book coach might let you know about that kind of stuff. Anyhow, I tend to let people know like, you know, I'm noticing this pattern of this, go through your book and check it and make sure that it's not a problem or it's you know, make sure you're not doing it too much. There's also a lot of websites and things that talk about certain words that are overused all the time, so you can look for those yourselves. But if you are self publishing, I would advise if you have the money to hire a developmental story coach on your entire novel to make sure it's strong. And then hire an editor or a line editor, if you want to skip those steps, which I find that so many writers want to skip the steps to get their books polished, and they just want to get the book out there, that's fine. Know that it's fine. But please do your best to get as strong as possible. You do not have to have a book coach or a line editor, go through your novel, but if you're self publishing, it would you know it would serve you well, if you could do at least the first few times out. If you're a traditionally published again, you don't need either as long as you are going to workshops, and really working on your book before it goes to agents. So that's what I was gonna say somebody suggested in that recent Facebook post this morning, just go to conferences, and this writer is new. And she was like, Well, where do I find them? I don't know where to find them. Okay, so, first of all, narrow yourself down to your genre what you're writing. If you write women's fiction, there is the women's fiction writers Association, which you can join. And they have tons and tons of resources and workshops. And they also have conferences and retreats every year. The Society of children's book writers and illustrators, which is picture books through young adult has conferences, and they also have free things called mingles now since 2020. I'm not sure what's happening with the mingles but they have tons of online resources. Every region has stuff all the time to help you. Plus, there are Facebook groups like crazy, and it's a really close network of people worldwide, who will help you with workshops and stuff. The highlights foundation is an amazing place for workshops. If you're writing picture books through young adult, the romance Writers of America while they have had some problems, admittedly, they are also a great resource if you are writing romance or contemporary romance, wanting to write for Hallmark or lifetime, this kind of thing. It's a great organization. There is sisters in crime, which is for females who write crime and thrillers. There is there's one for mysteries and I can't think of the name of it offhand. But there's also the science fiction writers Association. You do have to be published to be a member. But there are so many conferences out there. There's the Rocky Mountain fiction conference in Denver. There is the pikes peaks Writers Association in Colorado, my sister lives in Colorado. I'm a member of these things because she lives in Colorado and I visit and that's how I know about them. There is the Writer's Digest. And they have two big conferences. They have a novel writing conference in Pasadena every October and they have a big writing conference in New York every summer. And I believe this year, it's online, but usually it's in person. There are many, many, many ways to workshop, your writing. If you're writing for screen or television, there are many online coaches. There's the UCLA extension, same thing for novels, UCLA extension, I think Toronto, and Canada has an online school for writers. You could get an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts, or Hamlet or any of these. There's so many options out there. But the best way when you're starting is to start where you're at. If you're brand new, and you want to write romance novels, then find out where the romance novel groups are on Facebook. Instagram is a great place to follow authors and learn more about things like that. Twitter is also a great resource as long as you don't get sucked down the rabbit hole and political stuff. I guess that goes for all social media.
tik tok author talk book talk is huge right now. And you can find out a lot there. It's, there's so many ways that you can find out and improve your craft before you even are ready for a book coach. So basically, only you can access access, I'm sorry, only you can assess where you are. And if you are ready to hire somebody or not. Ask yourself questions like what are my writing goals? What is my timeline? And you know, if you have experience, if you're brand new, and you've never written a book, you probably shouldn't spend the money on book coach yet, you should probably write that novel, The best way to write a novel is to sit down and write a novel. I know that sounds ridiculous. It's like that thing that goes around Facebook. And there's like, you know, this is how you draw an owl and there's like two circles. And then there's this perfectly rendered drawing of an owl and it says like, now draw the F an owl. That's hilarious, but it sounds that way. But the truth is, the best way to become a writer is to write you have an idea in your head, sit down and write it. There are heaps and heaps and heaps and heaps of craft books on Amazon. There are many great ones out there that people talk about all the time. I will mention a few now. Lisa crown has wired for story and story genius, which I highly recommend. There's also anatomy of a story there, which I think is by john Truby. James Scott bell has a few craft books. One is writing from the middle out. Martha Allison has the plot whisperer books. Steve Kaplan has the hidden tools of comedy and the hero's journey. Robert McKee, who is known for screenwriting, but he has an amazing book on story. He also has one on dialogue. sinquefield has books out, Ellen Sandler, if you're writing for television comedy, she has a workbook out that I'd say if you're writing comedy, you have to read this even though, you know, it's been a while since Ellen has worked in television and things are changing. But the basics are there. There are, there's the save the cat series of books, I personally like the first one, I took classes with Blake Snyder in Los Angeles before he passed away. And I learned so much from him the save the cat books are invaluable resource. There's so many resources, so only you can really assess where you need to be if you're at the beginning and start with those craft books, and then join some organizations and start going to workshops and get that novel finished. You can join NaNoWriMo they have camp NaNoWriMo in July and NaNoWriMo in November, which is writing a novel in a month. The great thing about writing a novel in a month is it forces you to sit down and write and focus on the story and not focus on being a great writer because it's pretty impossible in a month to edit as you go. So I hope this has been helpful for you. I know I covered so much in this 30 minutes. There's a lot of information in the show notes. I don't do transcription right now, because I don't know if it's my accent or the way that I speak but it never comes even remotely close. Anybody who knows me personally and has gotten a message from me, I'm always apologizing, like the voicing said totally something different than what I was talking about. But I have a lot of information in the show notes. You can always find me on social media. The links are in the show notes or on my website. Send me a email at Stephanie at you Donnie being calm. Tell me you're a listener of this podcast and ask questions because I'm always here to help new writers and I'm not trying to sell you anything. Of course I would love to have lots of you become my clients, but I am not a salesperson. I only take riders on who are ready I turned many writers away cuz you're simply not ready and I don't want to take your money because then you're going to be upset that you spent all this money and it's not going to work so I'm very picky and It is also something to look for. Sorry I didn't mention at the beginning but thank you for listening and come back every week for a new podcast. And I hope that this was helpful and share it with other writers who may also need some help finding a book coach or even if they need one, okay. Cheers. Happy writing.

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